Liquid biopsy.Circulating tumour cells, a non invasive cancer detection test – Freedom Age

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Contact Us
Dr Kalpana Gupta Sekhawat
FF- 137, Block – A JMD Megapolis, Sohna Road, Gurg
Gurgaon
Haryana 122001 
India
Phone:9899147100
freedomages@gmail.com

Early detection usually offers the best chance to beat cancer. Unfortunately, many tumors are not caught until they’ve grown relatively large and spread to other parts of the body. That’s why researchers have worked so tirelessly to develop new and more effective ways of screening for cancer as early as possible. One innovative approach, called “liquid biopsy,” screens for specific molecules that tumors release into the bloodstream.A test done on a sample of blood to look for cancer cells from a tumor that are circulating in the blood or for pieces of DNA from tumor cells that are in the blood.

How can this be used?
To help find cancer at an early stage
To plan treatment
To find out how well treatment is working
To find out if cancer has come back
The biggest benefit lies in the potential of liquid biopsies to detect disease progression or treatment resistance long before it would trigger clinical symptoms or appear on imaging scans.

Circulating tumor cells are intact tumor cells that are dislodged into the systemic circulation. These cells serve as seeds for subsequent growth of additional tumors (metastasis) at distant sites. Circulating tumor cells are primarily detected in various metastatic carcinomas such as breast, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers.

Circulating tumour cells is a blood test that can detect tumors early. This new test, which examines cancer-related DNA and proteins in the blood, yields a positive result about 70% of the time across eight common cancer types in more than 1000 patients whose tumors had not yet spread.

If you think you are at risk, either due to the family history or because you have suspicious symptoms, please contact us for this screening for early detection and prevention.

Dr Kalpana Shekhawat-M.D.

Functional Medicine Specialist

Early detection usually offers the best chance to beat cancer. Unfortunately, many tumors are not caught until they’ve grown relatively large and spread to other parts of the body. That’s why researchers have worked so tirelessly to develop new and more effective ways of screening for cancer as early as possible. One innovative approach, called “liquid biopsy,” screens for specific molecules that tumors release into the bloodstream.A test done on a sample of blood to look for cancer cells from a tumor that are circulating in the blood or for pieces of DNA from tumor cells that are in the blood.

How can this be used?
To help find cancer at an early stage
To plan treatment
To find out how well treatment is working
To find out if cancer has come back
The biggest benefit lies in the potential of liquid biopsies to detect disease progression or treatment resistance long before it would trigger clinical symptoms or appear on imaging scans.

Circulating tumor cells are intact tumor cells that are dislodged into the systemic circulation. These cells serve as seeds for subsequent growth of additional tumors (metastasis) at distant sites. Circulating tumor cells are primarily detected in various metastatic carcinomas such as breast, prostate, lung and colorectal cancers.

Circulating tumour cells is a blood test that can detect tumors early. This new test, which examines cancer-related DNA and proteins in the blood, yields a positive result about 70% of the time across eight common cancer types in more than 1000 patients whose tumors had not yet spread.

If you think you are at risk, either due to the family history or because you have suspicious symptoms, please contact us for this screening for early detection and prevention.

Dr Kalpana Shekhawat-M.D.
Functional Medicine Specialist

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